The Star's Jill Silva delves into the finer points of ramen. Her guide: chef Patrick Curtis, owner of Shio Ramen Shop at 3605 Broadway. Shio, the only KC shop that makes its own noodles. You'll want to see how fresh noodles are made and learn about the different broths and toppings on the menu. Jill Silva and Tammy Ljungblad The Kansas City Star
The Star's Jill Silva delves into the finer points of ramen. Her guide: chef Patrick Curtis, owner of Shio Ramen Shop at 3605 Broadway. Shio, the only KC shop that makes its own noodles. You'll want to see how fresh noodles are made and learn about the different broths and toppings on the menu. Jill Silva and Tammy Ljungblad The Kansas City Star

Chow Town

The daily dish on Kansas City's food and drink scene

Chow Town

Watch how Kansas City ramen shop Shio makes its housemade noodles

By Jill Wendholt Silva

jsilva@kcstar.com

September 21, 2017 05:48 PM

UPDATED September 21, 2017 05:49 PM

Shio Ramen Shop owner Patrick Curtis jokes that investing in a custom-made Yamato noodle machine was like buying a car.

The $30,000 machine provides a smooth ride by mixing, rolling and cuting dough into strands. The rolled dough unfurls from a cylinder then is cut into strands.

The finished noodle is sent down a short conveyor belt. Curtis, who sits on an upturned bucket for a seat, depresses an on/off switch with his right foot then grabs the noodles by the fistful and twists them into single-size portions.

Kansas City has been gaining ramen shops in the past few years, but Curtis is the only local chef who makes housemade noodles.

Never miss a local story.

Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access.

Curtis, who opened his 24-seat shop at 3605 Broadway about 18 months ago, demonstrated the ramen noodle-making process for a Wednesday Facebook Live Chow Town session.

Shio Ramen Shop serves three types of noodles:

1. Straight, like spaghetti served in shio and shoyu broth.

2. Wavy Sapporo-style, similar to cellophane packaged versions and includes egg powder, typically served with miso broth.

3. Tonkotsu, featuring a thinner, drier straight spaghettini-style noodle that is served only on Tuesdays with a rich pork broth that simmers for 32 hours. “The idea is it doesn’t absorb and hold onto as much of the super-rich broth, so you’re not overblasting your mouth,” he says.

In the 20-minute version of the show, we also discussed the types of ramen on the menu and etiquette. Curtis provides square-tipped chopsticks to help grab noodles, a large wooden spoon — and a fork, if you ask for it.

“We get guests who ask for forks, nervously,” Curtis says. “We always say, ‘There’s no shame in the fork game.”