Brain cancer stem cells (left) are killed by Zika virus infection (image at right shows cells after Zika treatment). A new study shows that the virus, known for killing cells in the brains of developing fetuses, could be redirected to destroy the kind of brain cancer cells that are most likely to be resistant to treatment. Campbell, Matthew Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis
Brain cancer stem cells (left) are killed by Zika virus infection (image at right shows cells after Zika treatment). A new study shows that the virus, known for killing cells in the brains of developing fetuses, could be redirected to destroy the kind of brain cancer cells that are most likely to be resistant to treatment. Campbell, Matthew Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis

Feared Zika virus kills brain cancer stem cells, new research shows

September 05, 2017 12:51 PM