Dozens of family and friends gathered in the street between two family homes for a candlelight vigil for Monday night’s still-unexplained killing of four men in Kansas City, Kan., about a mile away. Many were relatives of Mike Capps, also know as Chainsaw, and two brothers, Clint and Austin Harter, all shot to death along with another man Monday night at Capps’ home. Jill Toyoshiba and Ian Cummings jtoyoshiba@kcstar.com, icummings@kcstar.com
Dozens of family and friends gathered in the street between two family homes for a candlelight vigil for Monday night’s still-unexplained killing of four men in Kansas City, Kan., about a mile away. Many were relatives of Mike Capps, also know as Chainsaw, and two brothers, Clint and Austin Harter, all shot to death along with another man Monday night at Capps’ home. Jill Toyoshiba and Ian Cummings jtoyoshiba@kcstar.com, icummings@kcstar.com

Crime

Families come together in candlelight vigil for four slain in KCK

By Ian Cummings

icummings@kcstar.com

March 08, 2016 9:47 PM

Update at 2 a.m. Wednesday:  The Missouri Highway Patrol says that Pablo Antonio Serrano-Vitorino, 40, who is suspected of gunning down five people, four of them in Kansas City, Kan., was arrested about 12:18 a.m. Wednesday in Montgomery County, Mo.

Serrano-Vitorino was found lying in mud on a hill just north of Interstate 70 outside the search perimeter. He was armed with a rifle, but no shots were fired.

“He looked exhausted,” said Sgt. James Hedrick of the Missouri Highway Patrol.

There is a culvert that runs underneath the interstate, but it was not immediately clear if that was how Serrano-Vitorino got across.

The area where he was apprehended is near a McDonald’s restaurant and several motels near the intersection of I-70 and Missouri 19 in New Florence.

Serrano-Vitorino, a Mexican national who lived in KCK, is accused of fatally shooting four men late Monday night at his neighbor's home. He also was wanted in connection with the shooting death of 49-year-old Randy Nordman in Montgomery County.

Serrano-Vitorino is expected to appear later this morning in Montgomery County court.

A day after Monday night’s still-unexplained killing of four men in Kansas City, Kan., friends and family members gathered in the street to share their pain and their questions.

About 60 people mingled together, lighting candles and saying prayers, in the 2600 block of South 48th Street on Tuesday night. Many were relatives of Mike Capps, also known as Chainsaw, and two brothers, Clint and Austin Harter, all shot to death along with another man Monday night at Capps’ home near 36th and Oliver streets, about a mile away. Police have not yet released the names of the victims, but relatives identified family members who were killed.

Ruth Harter, Clint Harter’s widow, led the group in a prayer. She said the brothers would be buried together Monday. She had been married to Clint Harter for eight years and their daughter Zoivanii is 2 years old. Ruth Harter is eight months pregnant. She said her husband was good family man. “He was a loving person,” she said. “He was a loving husband.”

“I have to be strong,” she said. “I have a 2-year-old.”

The vigil spilled out into the street, midway between the homes of members of the Harter family and the Capps family, who live across from each other. Family members said the Harter brothers had been visiting Capps when the shooting happened. Capps was a father with two sons, ages 7 and 3.

At the vigil, some stood in stunned silence, huddled together in the candlelight. Others traded questions, mystified at why the men were shot. Even as they spoke, a manhunt continued in Missouri for Capps’ next-door neighbor, who is charged in the killings. Pablo Antonio Serrano-Vitorino, 40, is charged with four counts of murder and was last seen in a rural area near New Florence, about midway between Columbia and St. Louis on Interstate 70. Serrano-Vitorino was also being sought in the killing of a 49-year-old man near there Tuesday morning.

None of it made any sense to Mike Capps’ 23-year-old brother Cody, who said the news hit him “like a ton of bricks.” Mike Capps had no enemies, Cody said, and neither did the Harter brothers, who always seemed to be together. “Those were two brothers who loved each other,” he said.

The group planned another vigil for Wednesday. Family members were taking up a collection to pay funeral costs for Mike Capps and Austin Harter.

Never miss a local story.

Sign up today for a free 30 day free trial of unlimited digital access.